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Author Blog Challenge – Day 1 Recap

OK – I don’t promise to be this thorough every day, but here’s a recap of the posts for the first day of the Author Blog Challenge. If you missed them on our Facebook group page, here are my favorite sentences or vignettes from a bunch of the posts for Day 1 of the Author Blog Challenge.

Many folks used the prompt we provided about their earliest writing memories, but a fair number went their own directions. Some are funny, others poignant, still others wildly inspirational. I am humbled to be in the company of such fantastic writers!

If we missed anyone, please trust that we’ll catch you on the next wave!

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MATT MORAN. [W]rite the truth. You can edit the 2nd draft. But there is a certain amount of visceral energy in simply writing the unedited, dirty, sometimes disgusting, raunchy, beautiful, vulnerable – part of you.

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SONJA HALLER. I had discipline to write but what would prove most important in the telling of an unborn story was faith.

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JO HARRISON’s interview with Merita King. They’re set in the future when space travel is normal and many other inhabited worlds are known. There’s adventure and danger, monsters and creatures and spiritual beings form part of the central core of protagonists. For me, it is important to impart universal wisdom through the story and this aspect runs through all of my books.

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HEATHER WOOD. During fifth grade, I created this series of thrillers. The plots involved this killer who stalked people in the woods (thinking my inspiration was Friday the 13th). The funny thing about the stories was the killer and then later his cousin had the most non-threatening ridiculous names (Mac Aroni and Spud Ghettio).

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DOUG TURNBULL. I recalled an admonition from one of my high school English teachers, Mr. Young, that I should only write about what I know. I didn’t know much when I was young, so I had little about which to write.

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ASHLEY HOWLAND WILLOUGHBY. Elizabeth – Ann Howland always wanted to have her writing published. She was a great English teacher, who had a passion for literature. Mum wrote journals and sent a few off to publishers here in Australia, without much luck. I tried the same path, but after a few rejections decided to start surfing the net. Eventually I discovered Strategic book group and my first novel “Ghostnapped!” was accepted. So I decided to keep my maiden name and dedicate my book to my mum.

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DEE ANKARY. I wrote it out, long hand, in a notebook I had covered with a pretty light blue paper, dotted with white daisies. I used to carry this notebook around with me, taking the plot forward in my head, then feverishly writing whenever I had the chance.

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ROBERT CHAZZ CHUTE. Typing class would have been the single most useful thing I could have gotten out of high school, but I couldn’t take it because it wasn’t considered an academic credit (Stupid! Stupid! Stupid!).

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CHELSEA BLACK. People see a mediocre book that is 80,000 words as a major accomplishment but a daily blog with 80,000 page views a month isn’t anything to brag about these days as it says little about the content.

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MERLENE FAWDRY. I re-enrolled in the diploma course; time managed my multi-tasking and kicked procrastination to the rest home for bad habits while I got on with the business of being a writer. I wrote short stories and poetry, with moderate success in competitions and publication, and this time completed the diploma and the life story I’d failed to protect so many years before.

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CHARISMA KNIGHT. I love to write. I’ve written stories all my life, but I never thought I’d seriously embark on my writing journey. During my teenage years I maintained a journal and focused on putting my feelings to paper instead of actually talking to friends and family. Back then I lived in my own little world and it was very hard for me to express how I felt to those around me, for whatever reason. Shame, embarrassment, maybe even coming to terms with the fact that I was horribly depressed back then.

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SARA BENSON. Back in history, there were categorizations of jobs: hunters, millers, cobblers, blacksmiths, bakers, etc.  These are forms of businesses.  Back in those days, they either did it right, or they died (and oftentimes took an entire community with them).

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CARIANN JACOBUS MCCREADY. I remember in college a friend and I would have these late night writing sessions where we would spend literately hours working on stories and potential novels. Of course, then I had kids and the writing pretty much got put on hold, until the other night when my husband and I were out on a date and he mentioned that one thing he missed from our early years dating was reading my writing (he use to read my pieces and papers for content), so I was basically given a free pass to write again,

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NIKKI MORGAN. So, while living in the dooms and glooms of single motherhood (well, that’s how it felt for the first few months as mega adjustments took place), I wanted something positive I could focus on and Wonderfully Women was born from that. Why not share some of the wonderful things I have learned and hopefully make someone else’s day better.

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MELISSA GIJSBERS KHALINSKY. What is so exciting about this challenge? The main thing is it involves other writers. As this blog is about my writing journey, it seems that other writers are the ones who are most interested in what I post.

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DANIELLE PEDERSON. I’ve done it. I’ve finally bitten the bullet and decided to really make a go of both my blogs and my writing. So for the next month it’s all writing, all the time. Hip-hip-hooray for that!

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SAHM ATAINE KING. I was 14 years old when I got my hands on my first fantasy novel.  It was Terry Brooks’ Elfstones of Shannara.  From that day forward, I understood the true power and value of the written word. I had been reading for years, as well as involving myself in other artistic ventures.  When I opened that book and begun reading it, I couldn’t put it down.  It was something magical to me, a very specific feeling that I needed to capture; it was something I needed to make a part of myself.  I had to have this power.

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PATTI GOLDENSON. I remember wanting to write even before I could.  I loved pencils and crayons and markers. I would take out paper from my sister’s notebook and play writer.  I would make all kinds of marks on the paper and then take it to my mom or dad and read them the story that I wrote.

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ANNE MCAULEY. What, dogs are too drooly to play with an iPad?  Are you afraid I’ll try to get the squeaker out of it?  Please!  I’m more refined and dignified than that.

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KATHI LAUGHMAN. If you, like me, struggle with the grind of daily discipline, then you are in the right place.  I am off on an incredible journey over the next 28 days participating in an Author’s Blog Challenge.  The operative word in this case is challenge.  A challenge a group of authors have each given ourselves.  To contribute our words everyday for 28 days. And I’ll be learning as I go about how to make this blog a better place for you and for me.  A place of learning and a place of growth.  A place always dedicated to the art of possibility.

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NATASHA DEONARAIN. We’re waiting for the capped crusaders to save us. But that’s the problem. Those crusaders are going to hand us a sack that looks like it’s filled with gold. But there’s only a lump of coal inside. All the gold is still going to Wall Street. So here’s a solution. It’s a scary thought, but waiting for something to happen is even scarier. Are you ready? Change is going to have to come from the public. Yes, that means you and I.

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LISA CHERRY. I have always had a deep belief within me that I was a writer but life tended to get in the way….until now. Three years ago, while in huge emotional pain, I started writing ferociously, overwhelmed by emotional hurt but this time, as I healed, I didn’t put the (metaphorical) pen back down. Blogging has become not only something I do nearly every day but something I need to do. I need to write. It is no longer a choice and I cannot envisage what will stop me. I have now written a book which is published on 15th June and when asked recently at a talk I was delivering whether I would write any more books, I emphatically replied “yes!” And without any hesitation I continued, “I want to write 12 books!”

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ELISE FREE. When you are inspired to create, how persistent are you? When inspiration strikes you, do you allow it to move you? Or do you simply notice and watch it?

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SUSAN WRIGHT. Yearly reads. There are three books I read almost every spring: The Secret Garden, Practicing His Presence, and Knowing God. All three books give me an emotional boost. They revitalize my spirit and get me looking forward to whatever life has for me.

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CKAY BROOKS. In a recent answer to a submission request, Brooks explained to Quinn Barrett of Wise Bear  Books that every corner of the world is unique and influences the lives of those who live there, so for me as a writer, the places where my stories take place are just as important as the people. Surrounding details and influences can give the reader insight to solve the mystery, as well as what it might be like visit or to live next door.

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T.L. BODINE. My mother admonished me not to let anybody at school read my stories because she suspected the counselor would call me in for an intervention.  She was totally right, of course, but it upset me a lot and it made me nervous about writing at all.

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RACHEL EDGE. I have advised my friend to spend her entire life quietly, in a cupboard, out of the way and to note what a change this makes on her attracted karma.

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ALANA MAUTONE. No, I think it was when I was 10 or 11.  I loved superhero comics (Superman, Batman, Spider-Man, and a host of other).  I decided to make up my own superhero comics.  The hero I created was “Cold Man”,  He could freeze anything to near absolute zero.  I couldn’t draw worth a whit, so I enlisted the help of a friend with artistic talent. She, in turn, suggested my next venture and my first actual manuscript:  The Birdmen of Zuma.  The Birdmen of Zuma were half man, half canary, and lived hidden away in the Canary Islands.  An American pilot crash landed near their city. It went downhill from there.

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SANDI TUTTLE. I figured out that I could keep the story going if I wrote it down.  I would get scraps of paper from the wastebasket next to my Mother’s desk, and write long, rambling stories that I would ultimately act out with my ponies and dolls.  The more I wrote, the more I was out of everyone’s way, and the happier they were with me.  The words in my life were no longer without meaning.  I had discovered another route to power and peace – writing and being unseen.

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TIA BACH. The writer I most admire… my mother. She’s the one who inspired me to write. But, more importantly, she’s the one who made me believe I could write. I never thought I’d publish a novel. I wrote for therapy. Whenever I questioned life, I wrote about it. Journals. Stories.

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CIRCE DENYER. A friend told me one of her favorite authors indicated that things have a tendency to take ten times what you think they will. I see that in my business.  I am usually surprised by it in my writing life.

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RAVEN SIKER. The writing prompt is to write 5 things that you love to see, taste, smell, hear or touch. It’s that simple.

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KEBBA BUTTON. Can you help yourself move through grief faster?  Of course, counseling can help.  Fortunately, there are also some things you can do without a professional, to shorten your grief process.  These are seven top choices. (1) Journal.  (2) Write them a letter.  (3) Go to the service.  Stay for the cookies and punch.  (4) Write in the online memory book and Facebook. (5) Give something in their memory.  (6) Share your photos.  (7) Get your fresh air and exercise.

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JODI ROSENBERG. Forgiving someone is rarely a mandate in the American society, but it is often the best thing you can to do for yourself and others.  It is not necessary to let the other know they are forgiven.  There are situations when it is simply best to release another from your own internal struggle.

Thanks to all who posted!

Laura & Marcie

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The Author Blog Challenge is hosted by Laura Orsini and her alter ego, Marcie Brock, of the Marcie Brock – Book Marketing Maven blog. Please visit Marcie’s blog for loads of great info about low- to no-cost methods of marketing for self-publishing authors.